Hysteresis In The C-Suite—-Why The GOP Tax Bill Won’t Stimulate “Growth” (Part 3)

Yesterday (Part 2) we documented the vast difference between the Reagan Tax Cut of 1981 and the GOP Tax Bill of 2017—-both as to scale and potential to stimulate supply-side growth of output, investment, jobs and earnings.
In a word, the Reagan tax cut averaged 4.0% of GDP over a decade and was predominately focused on supply-side incentives via a 25% marginal rate cut for individuals and a giant business cut. The latter would amount to $300 billion per year at today’s economic scale, and, crucially, was also tightly linked to CapEx via the 10-5-3 depreciation incentive for new plant, equipment and technology purchases.
By contrast, the current GOP Tax Cut is just one-tenth the size (o.4% of GDP) of the Reagan cut over the next decade and has virtually no supply-side incentives at all. The individual income tax cuts are temporary and reflect a Keynesian purpose to put “money in the pockets” of workers via, for instance, doubling the standard deduction and child credit.
At the same time, the heart of the GOP tax cut is a wholly misguided $1.4 trillion 10-year reduction of the corporate tax rate to 21%. But under the deformed monetary and financial conditions of the present, that will actually just put money in the brokerage accounts of the wealthy and Wall Street speculators.

This post was published at David Stockmans Contra Corner on Friday, December 22nd, 2017.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*